Paediatric and Adolescent Treatment

Access to life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART) for pregnant women living with HIV has increased globally, but less than half of the 1.4 million infants born to mothers living with HIV were tested within 2 months of birth. And among the 2.1 million children (aged 0-14) living with HIV, less than half (43 per cent) started treatment. This has deadly consequences. In sub-Saharan Africa, children who test positive for HIV start taking ART at an average age of 3.8 years.

Social Protection

There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that social protection can reduce the risk of HIV infection by addressing some of the key drivers of HIV infections among children and adolescents, such as poverty, gender inequality and lack of access to education. Social protection programmes that can have significant positive impacts on HIV among these populations include a range of economic, social, and psychosocial provisions administered by governments, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and communities.

In Mozambique, adolescents support national HIV response

During 14 and 15 December 2015, 29 adolescents in Mozambique representing all provinces were invited to participate in a Multi-sectoral National Meeting to develop a response to address the HIV situation affecting about 120,000 new infections in adolescents a year.

MAPUTO, Mozambique, 30 March 2016 – During 14 and 15 December 2015, 29 adolescents in Mozambique representing all provinces were invited to participate in a Multi-sectoral National Meeting to develop a response to address the HIV situation affecting about 120,000 new infections in adolescents a year.

A mother’s loving care, protected her baby from disease

A parent's ability to care for her child is dependent upon her ability to care for herself. For Alzira, a mother with HIV, that is no simple task.

TETE, Mozambique, 24 March 2016 – A parent’s ability to care for her child is dependent upon her ability to care for herself. For Alzira, a mother with HIV, that is no simple task.

Innovation in HIV programming

In November 2012, the MAC AIDS Fund provided UNICEF funding for a two-year project to improve and scale up access to HIV testing, treatment and care among children and adolescents.  The project was extended through 2016 to link HIV testing to follow-up treatment and support services particularly among 13-to19-year-olds living with HIV, as well as adolescents at highest risk for HIV infection (e.g.

Call for adolescent-friendly services for adolescents living with HIV in Kenya

NAIROBI, Kenya, 20 February 2016 – AIDS is the leading cause of death in adolescents in Kenya. In Nairobi, 60 adolescents voiced the need to have an effective service delivery system specifically tailored to their circumstances. They passionately made this call at a National Forum For and By Adolescents Living with AIDS, highlighting issues such as HIV prevention, care and treatment for adolescents.