UNICEF

UNICEF’s Vision for the Global HIV Response 2018 – 2021

UNICEF has long been at the heart of global efforts to put the HIV epidemic into an irreversible and rapid retreat. Under the Strategic Plan for 2018–2021, UNICEF will continue to align its HIV-related commitments to global goals and targets detailed in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; the Political Declaration agreed to at the June 2016 United Nations High Level Meeting on Ending AIDS; the Fast Track Strategy to End AIDS developed and championed by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS); the United Nations Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health 2016–2030; the ‘Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free’ Framework for Ending AIDS in Children, Adolescent Girls; and the All In Framework to end AIDS in Adolescents and Young Women by 2020 that emerged following the success of the Global Plan Towards the Elimination of New Infections Among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive (Global Plan).

All In to #EndAdolescentAIDS

To end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, specific—yet flexible—strategies are needed for different age groups, populations and geographical locations. Ending the epidemic among adolescents requires amplifying investments where they can make the most difference and fostering innovation by adolescents and youth themselves, as well as governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector.

UNICEF’s HIV Programming in the Context of COVID-19: Sustaining the gains and reimagining the future for children, adolescents and women


Recognizing the harmful impact that COVID-19 and related lockdown measures pose for the HIV response, governments across ESA region are implementing interventions to sustain hard won gains toward ending AIDS. UNICEF country offices in support of governments and in collaboration with community and international partners have stepped up with evidence-driven and innovative interventions to protect continuity of HIV services. This compendium provides a summary of the innovative approaches being taken across nine HIV priority countries, Botswana, Eswatini, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe.