WHO

Actions for improved clinical and prevention services: Preventing HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among women and girls using contraceptive services in contexts with high HIV incidence

This programmatic brief explores how to expand HIV and STI prevention and contraceptive method options in contraceptive services and, thus, to reduce HIV and STI incidence among adolescent girls and women. It focuses on settings with extremely high HIV prevalence and incidence. The brief complements existing guidance on HIV prevention and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), amplifies calls for action and outlines more comprehensive approaches to integration of SRHR and HIV services. It also emphasizes the importance of SRHR for women living with HIV. It aligns with updated WHO recommendations for contraceptive eligibility for women at high risk of HIV and other HIV guidance for adolescent girls and young women.

This brief is for national programme leaders, experts and members of national working groups on HIV and STI prevention in the context of contraceptive services. It is primarily relevant in settings with very high HIV prevalence in East and Southern Africa, in other high HIV prevalence settings in sub-Saharan Africa and for women from key populations in other regions. At the same time, it proposes differentiated strategies for settings with low, medium, high and extremely high HIV prevalence among women.

Operational Guidance for National Roll-Out of Family HIV Testing in West and Central Africa

HIV testing and treatment remains low among children in West and Central Africa. Various barriers prevent the scale-up of services and improved coverage for children, including limited coverage of early infant diagnostic capacity, limited decentralization of pediatric treatment including task-shifting/sharing from paediatricians to nurses and community actors, as well as prevalent HIV stigma at individual, family and community levels. Family-based HIV index testing has been identified as a game changer that can deliver quick gains for the paediatric HIV response in both high- and low prevalence settings. By using an individual family member living with HIV as an entry point to reaching the entire family unit, several underlying factors can be addressed, which limit access to HIV testing services especially for children.

This operational guidance is meant for use by national programme managers, implementers, advocates and health care providers in collaboration with partners, supported by national, regional and global experts. The guidance draws off the experience in family testing from within and outside West and Central Africa. It combines recommendations from the Dakar Expert consultation, which took place in June 2018, as well as lessons learned from the pilot of the Family Testing Operational Guidance in Liberia in June 2018. It is a living document that will be enriched as evidence on family Testing in the region grows. The use of this guidance will be complemented by a toolkit and a community of practice. It is a regional document drafted for the countries in West and Central Africa to guide country teams to design country-contextualized family HIV testing roll-out.

International Technical and Programmatic Guidance on Out-of-School Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE)

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), with collaborating partners from the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Secretariat of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), have developed this guidance to build upon and complement the UN International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education (ITGSE). It offers more in-depth programmatic guidance on how to develop CSE programmes that are appropriate and safe for different groups of children and young people, especially those who are unlikely to be addressed in CSE programmes for children and young people generally.

Available in English and Spanish.

Nurturing care for children affected by HIV

In the early years, we lay down critical elements for health, well-being and productivity, which last throughout childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Failure to meet a child’s needs during this critical period limits the child’s ability to achieve their full developmental potential and threatens the future of human capital and society in general. This is particularly so for children affected by HIV who experience several interrelated factors that may hinder the achievement of a child’s full developmental potential.

This brief from UNICEF and WHO describes the specific nurturing care components for children affected by HIV as well as facility-level and community-level actions for early childhood development.

Global guidance on criteria and processes for validation of EMTCT

In developing this revised document, WHO and the GVAC considered the input of national programmes, regional validation teams and committees, and experts in the areas of programme, data quality, laboratory standards, human rights, gender equality and community engagement. Topic areas that needed revision were also discussed during face-to-face meetings of the GVAC held in Geneva in June 2016 and June 2017.

Adolescent-friendly health services for adolescents living with HIV: from theory to practice

This publication primarily seeks to define and clarify the key elements of adolescent-friendly health services to help ensure that adolescents living with HIV receive appropriate and effective treatment, summarize existing guidance on adolescent-friendly health services and differentiated service delivery for adolescents living with HIV while showcasing best-practice case studies based on country experience in implementing these services.

This document is the result of collaborative work between the Department of HIV and Global Hepatitis Programme, WHO and the HIV/AIDS section, UNICEF.

Going the 'Last Mile' to EMTCT: A road map for ending the HIV epidemic in children

The 'Last Mile' road map draws on the latest scientific research and programmatic evidence to describe and recommend strategies to achieve the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (EMTCT). It includes a synthesis of evidence and country experiences for reaching EMTCT and recommends clear strategies that can improve the coverage, effectiveness and quality of national programmes for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT). The goal of this document is to provide guidelines for coordinated action so that national programmes address local priority areas to achieve EMTCT in an effective, people-centred, efficient and directed manner.

This document was conceptualized by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and partners including the Start Free working group, the Joint United Nations Programme for HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and it was validated by ministries of health of Botswana, Malawi, Seychelles, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Advocacy Brief on Breastfeeding and HIV

Led by UNICEF and WHO, the Global Breastfeeding Collective is a partnership of more than 20 prominent international agencies calling on donors, policymakers, philanthropists and civil society to increase investment in breastfeeding worldwide. The Collective’s vision is a world in which all mothers have the technical, financial, emotional and public support they need to breastfeed. The Collective advocates for smart investments in breastfeeding programmes, assists policymakers and NGOs in implementing solutions, and galvanizes support to get real results to increase rates of breastfeeding, thereby benefiting mothers, children and nations.

Download the advocacy brief on breastfeeding and HIV above. Learn more at unicef.org/breastfeeding.