HIV-Sensitive Social Protection: State of the evidence 2012 in sub-Saharan Africa

This review provides a conceptual framework for HIV-sensitive social protection policies and programmes and review the impact of social protection on HIV prevention and treatment outcomes in addition to social and economic care and support. It further provides recommendations for achieving core HIV impacts, comprehensive approaches, and expanding and sustaining HIV-sensitive social protection. 

Cash transfers: Past, present and future. Evidence and lessons learned from the Transfer Project

Building on previous summaries, this brief summarizes the current evidence and lessons learned from the Transfer Project after more than a decade of research on cash transfers in sub-Saharan Africa.

Since 2009, the Transfer Project has generated rigorous evidence on the impacts of cash transfers in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and has supported their expansion. It aims to provide evidence on the effectiveness of cash transfer programmes, inform the development and design of cash transfer policy and programmes, and promote learning across SSA on the design and implementation of research and evaluations on cash transfers. The Transfer Project is a collaborative network comprising UNICEF (Innocenti, Regional and Country Offices), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, national governments and researchers. 

Mental Health and Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence among Adolescents Living with HIV 

Building on research findings and effective interventions in low-and middle-income countries, this policy brief identifies key risks, including bullying and stigma, and facilitators, such as positive parenting and social support, that influence pathways between mental health and HIV outcomes for adolescents. It is part of a broader series that aims to support the translation of research into improved adolescent sexual reproductive health and HIV programming.

Good mental health and psychosocial wellbeing is especially important for adolescents during their transition to adulthood. It can support resilience and help initiate healthy behaviours that shape long-term positive health outcomes. Evidence shows that adolescents living with HIV are more likely to experience mental health challenges compared to their peers who do not have HIV. Poor mental health outcomes have been linked to low rates of adherence to life-saving antiretroviral treatment (ART) and retention in care.  Understanding risk factors and protective factors that influence mental health and ART adherence amongst adolescents is critical for effective programming. Within eastern and southern Africa, there is great momentum to identify and scale-up interventions that address mental health and improve treatment, care and support for adolescents living with HIV.

 

Accelerating Access to Optimal Child-Friendly Antiretroviral Formulations for Children Living with HIV: Lessons Learned from Eight Sub-Saharan African Countries

EGPAF, with funding and support from Unitaid and DNDi, is bringing new-to-market pediatric ARV formulations to full-scale implementation in eight African countries. We gathered and documented lessons learned from these eight project countries to inform, streamline and accelerate the introduction and roll-out of new, child-friendly ARVs so that all children living with HIV have access to optimal, WHO-recommended treatment and care.

Integrating peer support into service delivery: A good practice guide

This guide developed by Pediatric-Adolescent Treatment Africa (PATA) draws on lessons learned on integrating peer support strategies across several programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. It has been designed as an informative resource for the integration of peer support into HIV models of care for adolescents and young people in facility- and community-based settings. This toolkit is aimed primarily at health providers, specifically health facility managers and organizations engagement peer support programmes to strengthen health care./p>

HIV Pediatrics 2020 Workshop Report

The International Workshop on HIV & Pediatrics 2020 took place virtually on 16-17 November. It provided a global update on paediatric HIV and explored pertinent issues through dedicated plenary and oral abstract sessions on prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, paediatric treatment and care, and adolescents and HIV. It also included sessions on COVID-19 in children.

UNICEF and Virology Education have developed a workshop report that summarises highlights and learnings from each session.

Presentations and webcasts (provided speaker's consent) are also publicly available and can be accessed here.

New Evidence and Programming Implications for Adolescent Pathways in HIV Care in Sub-Saharan Africa

Adolescents have the lowest rates of retention in HIV care and ART adherence when compared to other age groups. It is essential for programmers to better understand the adolescent HIV care pathways in sub-Saharan Africa, where public HIV services have been decentralised throughout the region. This evidence and programming brief is the first in a new series focusing on programming for adolescents living with HIV developed in collaboration with Oxford University and the University of Cape Town. It provides a summary of evidence from a systematic review of adolescent care pathways in low- and middle-income countries, a longitudinal community-traced cohort of ART-initiated adolescents in South Africa, and qualitative interviews with HIV care providers. The brief additionally highlights key considerations for strengthening programming and services for adolescents living with HIV.