Ending HIV for Every Child, Every Adolescent: An investment opportunity for the public and private sectors

This document highlights opportunities for both public and private sectors to engage in the global HIV response for infants, children, and adolescents in partnership with UNICEF. 

UNICEF is a key partner and leader in the AIDS response for children, adolescents, and women. It collaborates with governments and partners worldwide, offering innovation, technical expertise, data and evidence, programme excellence, coordination, and convening power.

UNICEF is 100 per cent voluntarily funded, and is seeking support to deliver ambitious HIV results for children and to ensure the world can reach Sustainable Development Goal Target 3.3, to end the epidemic of HIV by 2030. 

Global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents: Standards and criteria

Global initiatives are urging countries to prioritize quality as a way of reinforcing human rights-based approaches to health. Yet evidence from both high- and low-income countries shows that services for adolescents are highly fragmented, poorly coordinated and uneven in quality. Pockets of excellent practice exist, but, overall, services need significant improvement and should be brought into conformity with existing guidelines.

The WHO/UNAIDS global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents aim to assist policy-makers and health service planners to improve the quality of health-care services, so that adolescents find it easier to obtain the health services that they need to promote, protect, and improve their health and well-being, according to their needs. 

This publication presents global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents, as well as an implementation guide and monitoring tools.

Translating evidence into practice

With support from the Joint UN 2gether 4SRHR programme, a research partnership with the University of Oxford and University of Cape Town was established with the aim to improve HIV, SRH, and the overall well-being of adolescents by providing sustainable and scalable services. The partnership, which was ongoing from 2018 to 2023, investigated drivers of HIV and SRH risk in adolescents, and was committed to generating and using the latest evidence to propose practical solutions, shape programmes and guide decision-making for adolescents.

The results of the partnership are being used in integrating evidence into programming for adolescents throughout the region. They are summarized in a synthesis report, along with the six evidence-to-action briefs featured here.

Leveraging the Learning from HIV Programming for Pregnant and Parenting Adolescent Girls

This brief, the first in UNICEF's new Leveraging the Learning series, sets out to leverage the learnings from holistic, integrated, multisectoral, and age- and gender-responsive approaches to respond to and reduce early and adolescent pregnancy, support young mothers, and improve health and well-being outcomes for adolescent girls and their children. 

Highlighting promising practices for pregnant adolescents living with HIV, the report is relevant for efforts to support all pregnant adolescent girls, regardless of their HIV status.

Assessment of the impact of social allowances on the quality of life of CLHIV in Tajikistan

This report presents the results of a study commissioned by UNICEF Tajikistan in collaboration with the Republican AIDS Centre and the NGO Guli Surkh to evaluate the impact of social allowances on the treatment outcomes of children living with HIV in Tajikistan. Of the 7,552 persons living with HIV in Tajikistan today, 10.2 per cent are children under the age of 18. As of December 2017, 90.5 per cent of these children were covered with antiretroviral therapy.

Story from ESARO: Young HIV advocates stand up to fake news and stigma

This article from the UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office highlights the efforts of young advocates addressing stigma and misinformation about HIV. 

The Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) region is home to more than 60 per cent of young people worldwide living with HIV. Stigma is a major challenge for young people, hindering their ability access HIV services and continue treatment as needed. 2gether 4 SRHR, in partnership with Sida, aims to ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health rights across ESA. 

The story features Ruele, a young advocate working with Y+ Kenya. He uses social media and advocacy to combat fake news about HIV and support young people to take medications without stigma by sharing his own experiences. 

 


 

Article

Young HIV advocates stand up to fake news and stigma
Too many people feel shame taking ART, especially young men. Ruele takes his ART in public to help normalise the idea of taking medication

By Fatima Shahryar

Spotlight Report: LGBTQI+ Youth in Brazil Speak Up

On this International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT) 2023, we unveil the UNICEF Spotlight Report on the Youth Aware initiative in Brazil. Youth Aware is a partnership with the Brazilian Ministry of Health, to transform the approach to HIV and STI prevention and treatment for LGBTQI+ youth through peer education and community mobilization. Young people in Brazil are disproportionately impacted by the HIV epidemic, and key populations face heightened vulnerability.

Supported by M·A·C VIVA GLAM, this flagship UNICEF programme redefines health services for adolescents, addressing their needs and the shifting landscape of gender and sexuality. The report showcases the stories of courageous individuals countering prejudice and sheds light on their aspirations and challenges. Together, we can challenge stigma, discrimination, and marginalization, advocating for a future where every young person can thrive. Join us as we celebrate IDAHOBIT and champion a healthier, more inclusive future.

ALL IN to #EndAdolescentAIDS

ALL In to #EndAdolescentAIDS

Around the world, an estimated 2.1 million adolescents between the ages of 10 and 19 years were living with HIV in 2016. Some 260,000 older adolescents (aged 15–19 years) were newly infected with HIV in 2016, or nearly  a new infection every two minutes. Nearly three out of four new infections occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. And adolescent girls continue to be disproportionately affected. Globally, nearly two thirds (65 per cent) of new HIV infections among adolescents aged 15–19 years were among girls.

Progress in preventing new infections among adolescents remains unacceptably slow, with new infections declining by only 14 per cent since 2010. Equally concerning, between 2000 and 2015, annual AIDS-related deaths declined for all age groups except adolescents (aged 10–19 years).

Demographic realities further undermine recent hopeful trends. In sub-Saharan Africa, the region most affected by HIV, the youth population has begun to explode in size and will continue to do so, with projections indicating that the number of people younger than 20 will double in 2030. That means redoubled efforts will be necessary to prevent an increase in new HIV infections among adolescents.

All In to End Adolescent AIDS logo

 

The ALL IN agenda was introduced to drive social change for better results in adolescents, to improve strategic prioritization and programming for adolescents, and to foster innovation and advocacy to ensure that countries build stronger, more sustainable systems; engage adolescents in the response and provide quality health care. It is a Fast-Track response for adolescents—linked to the Three Frees initiative ('Start Free', 'Stay Free', 'AIDS Free') to accelerate service delivery towards attaining both the 90–90–90 and adolescent specific targets.